Connect with us

Transforming Data Center Infrastructure With Blockchain

Blockchain Infrastructure

Cryptocurrency – just hearing the name – can spark discussion topics on how innovative and controversial it is. However, nowadays, there seems to be a consensus that blockchain – the technological backbone of every form of cryptocurrency – is the former. The latter part of the discussion comes from the fact that cryptocurrency is still new, and needs more improvement, before it can actually be considered a wildly-accepted type of commercial (public) currency.

On the bright side, companies like Google and Goldman Sachs have already started to invest in various blockchain firms. And, it’s expected that sometime in the future, more big-name companies will follow suit, if cryptocurrency succeeds. Therefore, data centers and cloud hosting services must be ready to serve these new blockchain-based companies, as well as their needs, in the coming years.

So, you may be wondering: How did we get here? 

How Did It Start?

Modern blockchain started in 2008 with Bitcoin, which is a peer-to-peer Electronic Cash System. This white paper was a form of cryptocurrency that could live on a distributed network without any centralized authority; and blockchain is the technical backbone of that system, or a distributed digital ledger or database for it. No central authority will be able to manipulate the blockchain, since the whole network contributes to its creation and maintenance.

How It Works

In blockchain, two parties will make a transaction, to which they advertise it to the network. Then, various network nodes pick up multiple transactions, and arrange them into blocks. Afterwards, miners will use computers to add this block to the ledger (or blockchain).

Now, in order to add these blocks to the blockchain, the task requires a lot of computing power. Why? Because each of these blocks come with a sort of attached mathematical puzzle. And, to solve these puzzles, they need computing resources. But don’t worry: these puzzles are what miners are interested in, because they’re usually rewarded with tokens, just for adding a block to the blockchain.

Before the existence of blockchain though, business transaction would’ve been made through a trusted third-party company (i.e. a bank or a government institution), in order to guarantee the integrity of a transaction between two parties. However, blockchain eliminates that need by opening up the possibility for business transactions between parties worldwide, without the need for any financial or government institutions to step in. 

What Blockchain Means For GPUs

The need for blockchain means elevated demand for graphical processing units (or GPUs). As blockchain calculates, miners will have to provide enough computing power for it. And, as cryptocurrencies and blockchain-based applications become more popular, the higher the demand for computing power. That’s where GPUs come in, since blockchain-based calculations are best performed on these units. 

Data centers and cloud-hosting services will also have to look into AMD and NVIDIA graphics cards, in order to better serve the blockchain market; however, these graphics cards can be pricey. And, they’ll have to better optimize their infrastructure to be GPU-compatible.

Concerns?

The most controversy that cryptocurrency has faced is its vulnerability to possible hacking schemes. One can argue that there are major concerns about blockchain hackers taking – or planning to take – advantage of the fact that cryptocurrency doesn’t have enough protection yet to sustain itself, in case of a security breach that can cost millions.

Concerns on cybersecurity for data centers, in that case, seems to have spawned from cryptocurrency market’s promise of immense riches and overnight successes, to where anyone – including bad actors and hackers – will create an ever-growing threat in the cyber realm.

“One example of hacking of cryptocurrency was in January of 2018, when hackers were able to steal more than $500 million (or £380 million) worth of cryptocurrency from the Tokyo-based cryptocurrency exchange Coincheck,” adds Barnard. “Thus, that story, to this day, serves as a warning to what can happen, if cryptocurrency is unchecked. And, this story has many people concerned about whether cryptocurrency is safe to invest in or not.”

Conclusion

As you can see, data centers will have to go above and beyond to better accommodate the growing trend of cryptocurrency. And, to do so, they’ll need a good functioning digital infrastructure, to handle blockchain systems and increasing data processing demands.

This need for the right data center infrastructure is also increasing, since blockchain is expected to greatly impact the following:

  • Finance
  • Healthcare
  • Government
  • Transportation
  • Manufacturing
  • Medicine
  • Logistics
  • Other various industries 

Thus, it’s absolutely necessary for data center service providers to stay competitive, when it comes to such changes in technology, including blockchain. Ultimately, with an up-to-date infrastructure for blockchain to work on, data centers will be able to be sustainable, regardless of any changes and or developments made in the tech world for many years to come.

Author’s Bio: Katherine Rundell is a writer and editor at UK Writings and Academized. In her spare time, she likes to travel to different states, give special talks in various business training courses, read her favorite books (ranging in different genres).

Thank you for reading and sharing this article. We appreciate you.

Stay safe and healthy!

Top 5 Cryptocurrencies 2020

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER

Everything in this article is an opinion, not an advice of any kind. This material has been prepared for general informational purposes only and it is not intended to be relied upon as accounting, tax, investment, legal or other professional advice. Please consult with a professional for specific advice.

We do not endorse or guarantee the accuracy of the information and claims made.

All product and company names are trademarks™ or registered® trademarks of their respective holders. Use of them does not imply any affiliation with or endorsement by them.

 

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

TRENDING